Is disruption good for business?

We’re all (well, if we’re not we should be) experiencing massive change. For many of us it’s the first time. For us who are longer in the tooth, and that includes me, it’s a familiar pattern every seven to ten years. Maybe we’re lucky, maybe we’re not.

I for one find it fascinating studying these major shifts – how we mostly fail to recognise them coming, then go into denial, then the smart ones get changing rapidly to adapt. And they’re mostly always the big winners.

I read an interesting article on BBC online dated 25 October by Genevieve Shore. The eye-catching tile was ‘Why disruption is good for business’ and Ms Shore was expressing the view, and I quote “that no one company can have a monopoly on the talent available across our amazing world, and we can be more effective at innovating if we leverage great minds inside and outside our company. In fact, this is just common sense. It’s about finding smart people, partners and customers wherever they may be who can positively impact on your business and its customers.’

To me that reads ‘seek advice.’ Get mentors, get strangers on your board, try a different designer, change those tired old scripts, refresh the brand, the list goes on. But know what? It’s fun, it’s invigorating and it inspires brilliant fresh ideas from everyone. Try it. If that’s not for you then I humbly suggest you close up on or sell out!

Human beings are protective, fearing competition and rivalry, but let the doors open and then you encourage continual and fast innovation, high team morale, increased sales and customer satisfaction. And that translates to the bottom line – and here’s a big one – and adds to the value of your asset. Worth a thought for when you choose to move on, or maybe or have to. Yes, rotten stuff happens. The conclusion is simple, we can all be more disruptive and unpredictable, and great things flow. The result? You’re more competitive – and you haven’t slashed your prices.

Continuing her article Ms Shore says “This turbulence and pace of change has also led many organisations to revisit the nature of how they innovate.”

She continues giving a fascinating example “Rolls-Royce illustrates this shift to a service. When you buy a Rolls-Royce engine, you don’t buy a product, you buy the promise of a working engine for a number of years. Rolls-Royce monitors the engine remotely, gets parts to airports around the world and constantly innovates.”

How can you do a Rolls Royce in your business?

I’ll repeat the question, “Is disruption is good for business?” Well, you’ve got my answer, what’s yours?

Leave a post or drop me a note – I’d love to hear from you.

Watch for our forthcoming interview in our popular series with international award-winning guest Catherine Palin-Brinkworth. It’s titled ‘The magic of a mentor’ where Catherine shares her brilliant knowledge and skills as we learn how to get a mentor – and how to be a mentor. That’s franchising in a nutshell!

As with the disruption question, this will be another water-cooler topic for sure.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20042737

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